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    IAC-16 — 67th International Astronautical Congress

    D1. SPACE SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM

    This symposium addresses the present and future development of space systems and technologies, with sessions on System Engineering Methods, Processes, and Tools; Enabling Technologies for Space Systems; Significant Achievements in space systems with implications for Lessons Learned and future Training and Practice; Advanced System Architectures; and Innovative and Visionary Space Systems of the future. A special session addresses the emerging technologies and potential applications in the area of supplementary payloads “hosted” on spacecraft and constellations, where the mission of the hosted payload can be unrelated to the primary mission of the hosting system.

    Coordinator

    Reinhold Bertrand
    European Space Agency (ESA)Germany

    Jill Prince
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)United States

    D1.1. Innovative and Visionary Space Systems Concepts

    Dreams of yesterday are a reality today. Dreams of tomorrow need to be looked at today to make them real in the future. With emerging new technologies, it is now possible to conceptualise new and innovative space systems and new potential applications for the future. This session will explore innovative technologies, services, software and concepts for space systems for the future.

    Co-Chair

    Tibor Balint
    Jet Propulsion LaboratoryUnited States

    Peter Dieleman
    Netherlands Aerospace Centre (NLR)The Netherlands

    Rapporteur

    Camillo Richiello
    CIRA Italian Aerospace Research CentreItaly

    D1.2. Enabling Technologies for Space Systems

    This session will focus on innovative, technological developments that are usually high risk, but which have the potential to significantly enhance the performance of existing and new space systems. Enabling innovative technologies for space applications often result from spin-ins which will be discussed during the session, together with potential spin-offs. Examples include instrumentation, biotechnology, components, micro- and nano-technology, MEMs, advanced new structures and software techniques.

    Co-Chair

    Xavier Roser
    Thales Alenia Space FranceFrance

    Steven Arnold
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    Rapporteur

    Eiichi Tomita
    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)Japan

    D1.3. System Engineering - Methods, Processes and Tools (1)

    This session will focus on state-of-the-art system engineering methodologies - the methods, processs, and tools that reduce the time and cost, and improve the quality of space system design. Of special interest are multi-disciplinary methods, tools, and processes including modelling and simulation used to define system architectures to improve risk management, safety, reliability, testability, and quality of life cycle cost estimates.

    Co-Chair

    Dmitry Payson
    Russian Federation

    Dapeng Wang
    Beihang UniversityChina

    Rapporteur

    Franck Durand-Carrier
    Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)France

    D1.4. Space Systems Architectures

    The subject of this session is current and future space system architectures to increase performance, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of application. Topics of interest include the design of flight and ground system (hardware & software) architectures and the partitioning of functions between them, small satellite constellations and formations (swarms), and the use of on-board autonomy and autonomous ground operations.

    Co-Chair

    Peter Dieleman
    Netherlands Aerospace Centre (NLR)The Netherlands

    Franck Durand-Carrier
    Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)France

    Rapporteur

    Jill Prince
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)United States

    D1.5. Training, Achievements, and Lessons Learned in Space Systems

    System engineering training, the achievement of significant mission accomplishments in the face of challenges, both expected and unexpected, and the consequent lessons learned in design, development, and operation form basis for steady improvement of space system engineering practice for ensuring mission success. This session focuses on all aspects of this process, with papers on mission achievements with critical lessons learned and the application to future missions and development practice.

    Co-Chair

    Klaus Schilling
    University WuerzburgGermany

    Eiichi Tomita
    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)Japan

    Rapporteur

    Otfrid G. Liepack
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion LaboratoryUnited States

    D1.6. System Engineering - Methods, Processes and Tools (2)

    This session will focus on state-of-the-art system engineering methodologies - the methods, processes, and tools that reduce the time and cost, and improve the quality of space system design. Of special interest are multi-disciplinary methods, tools, and processes including modelling and simulation used to define system architectures to improve risk management, safety, reliability, testability, and quality of life cycle cost estimates.

    Co-Chair

    Geilson Loureiro
    National Institute for Space Research - INPE Brazil

    Norbert Frischauf
    TU GrazAustria

    Rapporteur

    Otfrid G. Liepack
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion LaboratoryUnited States

    D1.7. Hosted Payloads - Concepts, Techniques and Challenges, Missions and Applications

    Accross the space community there is increasing interest and activity in the area of hosted payloads. In this concept, one or more additional payloads are incorporated onto a main spacecraft, where the objectives of the hosted payloads are unrelated to the principal mission (e.g. commercial communications) of the main spacecraft. In this way, specialized observational, scientific, or experimental or operational payloads can be brought to orbit, even to geostationary orbit, for a fraction of the cost of building and launching independent satellites. The concept also provides for unique observational conditions, e.g. 24/7 global observation, that would be otherwise unaffordable for the instrument or payload classed under consideration. The approach presents unique challenges, that range from organizational relationships, through adaptation of mission requirements (e.g. observation geometry, RF susceptibility and emissions) to meet conditions required by the host spacecraft, to development, integration, test, and compatible on-orbit operation of divergent systems. Papers in this session will look at current missions and future opportunities and address both benefits and challenges as the world-wide space community moves into this exciting area.

    Co-Chair

    Dapeng Wang
    Beihang UniversityChina

    Igor V. Belokonov
    Samara National Research University (Samara University)Russian Federation

    Rapporteur

    Steven Arnold
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    D1.IP. Interactive Presentations

    Authors with an abstract accepted for an interactive presentation will be asked to prepare slides and display them for the duration of the congress on plasma screens. Authors will be assigned to interactive sessions in which they must be near the plasma screens to engage in interactive discussions with other congress attendees.

    Coordinator

    Reinhold Bertrand
    European Space Agency (ESA)Germany

    Jill Prince
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)United States