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    IAC-17 — 68th International Astronautical Congress

    D5. 50th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SAFETY, QUALITY AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN SPACE ACTIVITIES

    Quality, safety, security… These domains reflect a same concern: how a complex space system can be developed and be operated in order to give its best with the proper robustness. In that environment, where radiations are not the least stress and possible ill-intentioned actions may occur, decreasing the level of failures in space activities is a must. Knowledge management, meaning proper capturing, capitalising, protecting and sharing the knowledge, and application of lessons learned and experience, are key factors. This Symposium organized by the International Academy of Astronautics aims at arousing the discussion between professionals, and raising the awareness of the new generation on the various approaches to obtain and run reliable, and safe space systems: design solutions, validation and tests, software development, validation and security, methods, management approaches, regulations to improve the quality, efficiency, and collaborative ability of space programs and space operations. All aspects are considered: risk management, complexity of systems and operations, knowledge and information management, human factors, economical constraints, international cooperation, norms, and standards.

    Coordinator

    Jeanne Holm
    University of CaliforniaUnited States

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom

    D5.1. Safety and Quality for “Low Cost” Space Programs

    A constant ambition in space activities is running faster and cheaper programs ! It is often a sine qua non conditions for new stakeholders to enter the race. Short developments may also be a must, for instance for pedagogic purposes with the now numerous students satellites. What are the keys ? More recurrent space technologies ? More identical models ? On the opposite, more innovation ? New development and validation approaches ? Too many space missions do not meet success, the worse being when there are safety problems. This session provides an opportunity for exchanges on all aspects of the development philosophy, risk management, norms and cost index of development of novel transportation systems, orbital systems, exploration vehicles, test procedures, and operations to meet this challenge for every kind of aerospace missions including space tourism. It deals with the methods, tests, lessons learned, standards for analysis and mitigation of risks in space missions development and operations.

    Co-Chair

    Alexander S. Filatyev
    Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI)Russian Federation

    Manola Romero
    3AFFrance

    Rapporteur

    David Finkleman
    International Academy of AstronauticsUnited States

    D5.2. Knowledge management and collaboration in space activities

    Working on complex space missions requires collaboration, learning lessons from the past, transferring knowledge from experts to younger generations, and developing deep expertise within an organization. Typical questions addressed during the session are: how are aerospace organisations managing the sharing of the knowledge to develop new missions, what solutions are in place to work securely across corporate and international boundaries, how is knowledge captured, shared, and used to drive innovation and create value to the organization. This session focuses on the processes and technologies that organisations are using to sustain, energise and invigorate their ability to learn, innovate, and share knowledge within and amongst organisations for a sustainable, peaceful exploration of space. Examples of case studies and approaches of particular interest include successful projects and innovations in the application of knowledge management, grounded research in knowledge and risk management, methods that allow data, information or knowledge exchange within or amongst organisations in support of actual programmes.

    Co-Chair

    Lionel Baize
    Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)France

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom

    Rapporteur

    Jeanne Holm
    University of CaliforniaUnited States

    Patrick Hambloch
    University of Alabama in HuntsvilleUnited States

    D5.3. Prediction, Measurement and Effects of space environment on space missions

    Space environment characterized by various factors such as radiation, plasma, atomic oxygen, planetary dusts, extreme temperature, vacuum, micro-gravity, micrometeoroid and debris, etc. and its fluctuations strongly affects quality of space missions. Environmental conditions yield constraints at design phase, and important risks in the course of the mission. The evaluation of the average and worst case conditions to be met, and of their impact on missions and sub-systems are thus of prime importance. This session will encompass the following topics: Space Weather, Plasma, Spacecraft Charging, Radiation, Atomic Oxygen, Planetary Dusts, Combined Environments - flight measurements; - physical processes; - prediction of average or worst case condition; - ground testing; - flight experiments and lessons learnt; - modelling and prediction.

    Co-Chair

    Jean-Francois Roussel
    Office National d’Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA)France

    Mengu Cho
    Kyushu Institute of TechnologyJapan

    Rapporteur

    Justin Likar
    UTC Aerospace SystemsUnited States

    D5.4. Cyber-security threats to space missions and countermeasures to address them

    The increasingly pervasive network connectivity following the Internet explosion introduces a whole new families of cyber-security threats to space missions. To send commands to a spacecraft now you would not need to build a ground station, but you can penetrate from your home or office the existing ground infrastructures, challenging and bypassing their protection measures. These questions will have to be addressed in the session: - What is the interest of cyber-crime and cyber-activism with respect to space activities? - How are aerospace organisations managing the ability to introduce the right level of security measures in the process to develop new missions? - What solutions are in place to work securely across corporate and international boundaries? - How is knowledge about security threats captured, shared, and used to follow the evolution of cyber threats? - Which ones of these specific threats are to be expected to target space missions, from the ground and from space? - What is particularly to be expected from the cyber-space to target outer space? Case studies will focus for example on cryptography, processes, operational security, and other aspects of space missions that are all constituting the technical components to keep a mission “cyber secure”.

    Co-Chair

    Stefano Zatti
    ESAItaly

    Rapporteur

    Luca del Monte
    European Space Agency (ESA)France