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    IAC-19 — 70th International Astronautical Congress

    B4. 26th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

    The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Symposium on Small Satellite Missions is focused on recent advances in small satellite class missions weighing much less than 1000kg, addressing needs in government, commerce, or academia. Papers should focus on how microsatellites, nanosatellites, cubesats and small and “megaconstellations” amongst others enable valuable results for the mission end-user. Papers should benefit the wider smallsat community, and demonstrate a degree of ingenuity and innovation in small satellite utilisation, design, manufacture and/or engineering. Papers can report on important lessons-learned, describe notable missions in the planning stages, or include topics that demonstrate the value of small satellites and their constellations, their applications. Sessions cover the role that small satellites can play in developing space nations, science, exploration, “NewSpace”, communications and Earth Observation. Sessions also cover cost-effective operations, affordable and reliable access to space through launch, and emerging and promising smallsat technologies and techniques. This symposium will accept submissions for oral presentations only.

    Coordinator

    Alex da Silva Curiel
    Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL)United Kingdom

    Jian Guo
    Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)The Netherlands

    Support

    Rhoda Shaller Hornstein
    United States

    B4.1. 19th Workshop on Small Satellite Programmes at the Service of Developing Countries

    This workshop is organized jointly by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). It shall review the needs that could be satisfied and results achieved by developing nations through using small satellites. National space plans and examples of application results and benefits shall be included. Small satellite programmes in Africa, Latin America, and Eastern Europe would be of particular interest to the session. The workshop shall also review the results of international cooperation, technology transfer, lessons learned and the extent to which these efforts have contributed to the space maturity of developing countries.

    Co-Chair

    Sias Mostert
    Space Commercial Services Holdings (Pty) LtdSouth Africa

    Hui Du
    United Nations Office for Outer Space AffairsAustria

    Rapporteur

    Danielle Wood
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)United States

    Pierre Molette
    France

    Sergei Chernikov
    United Nations Office for Outer Space AffairsAustria

    B4.2. Small Space Science Missions

    This session will address the current and near-term approved small/micro/nano missions whose objective is to achieve returns in the fields of Earth science, solar, interplanetary, planetary, astronomy/astrophysics observations, and fundamental physics. Emphasis will be given to results achieved, new technologies and concepts, and novel management techniques.

    Co-Chair

    Stamatios Krimigis
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    Larry Paxton
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    Rapporteur

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom

    B4.3. Small Satellite Operations

    This session covers the planning for, and execution of, cost-effective approaches for Small Satellite Operations, with emphasis on new missions, including constellations of small satellites, with new models of operation to reduce mission lifecycle costs and to minimize the cost impact of mission extensions. Papers addressing innovation, an entrepreneurial approach to new business opportunities, novel finance and business models, management techniques, and international cooperation in support of Small Satellite Operations are particularly encouraged. Papers that discuss the application of novel technology to mission operations, such as automation and autonomy, constraint resolution, and timeline planning, as well as reports on missions recently accomplished and lessons learned, are also welcome. For papers not addressing small satellites, please refer to Symposium B6.

    Co-Chair

    Andreas Hornig
    University of StuttgartGermany

    Peter M. Allan
    STFCUnited Kingdom

    Rapporteur

    Norbert Lemke
    OHB System AGGermany

    Lynette Tan
    Singapore Space and Technology Association (SSTA)Singapore, Republic of

    B4.4. Small Earth Observation Missions

    We call for papers that will present information to decision makers, scientists, engineers, and managers about cost-effective small satellite missions, instruments, technologies, and designs of both current and planned Earth and near-Earth missions. This session addresses the technologies, applications and missions achieved through the use of small, cost-effective satellites to observe the Earth and near-Earth space. Innovative cost-effective solutions to the needs of the science and applications communities are sought. Satellite technologies suited for use on small satellites including those in the single to multiple cubesat range are particularly encouraged. Satellite or technology development efforts that make use of innovative launch opportunities, such as the developing space tourism market and commercial launch capability, hold significant promise for low-cost access to space make Earth observation missions attainable to non-governmental organizations as well as traditional users: papers addressing these evolving opportunities would be welcomed.

    Co-Chair

    Carsten Tobehn
    European Space Agency (ESA)The Netherlands

    Larry Paxton
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    Rapporteur

    Werner R. Balogh
    World Meteorological Organization (WMO)Switzerland

    Marco Gomez Jenkins
    Imperial College LondonUnited Kingdom

    B4.5. Access to Space for Small Satellite Missions

    A key challenge facing the viability and growth of the small satellite community is affordable and reliable space access. Topics of interest for this session include utilization of dedicated launches; development of ride-share systems, auxiliary payload systems, and separation and dispenser systems; and responsive integration approaches that will enable efficient small satellite access to space. Includes lessons learned from users on technical and programmatic approaches. For a dedicated discussion of small satellite propulsion systems, please refer to session B4.5A-C4.8. For a discussion of small launchers concepts and operations, please refer to session D2.7.

    Co-Chair

    Alex da Silva Curiel
    Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL)United Kingdom

    Philip Davies
    Deimos Space UK LtdUnited Kingdom

    Rapporteur

    Jeffery Emdee
    The Aerospace CorporationUnited States

    B4.5A-C4.8. Joint Session between IAA and IAF for Small Satellite Propulsion Systems

    This session will pay particular attention to propulsion systems and associated technologies as an enabler to efficient small satellite access to space and orbit change. Papers are invited discussing the particular challenges of design, manufacture, testing, operations and technological developments of small satellite propulsion systems, and the challenges of obtaining high performance within a small volume and mass. The scope includes chemical and electric propulsion systems for major orbit changes, fine orbit control and maintenance, and end-of-life disposal. This sessions will be accepting submissions for oral presentations only. For papers with an emphasis on the small satellite and its system design, refer to other B4 sessions. For focus on other propulsion system and technologies, refer to other C4 sessions.

    Co-Chair

    Jeffery Emdee
    The Aerospace CorporationUnited States

    Arnau Pons Lorente
    Purdue UniversityUnited States

    B4.6A. Generic Technologies for Small/Micro Platforms

    This session covers emerging and promising generic technologies for small and micro platforms. Real-life examples are particularly encouraged, both recently launched and shortly to be launched (next 3 years).

    Co-Chair

    Philip Davies
    Deimos Space UK LtdUnited Kingdom

    Joost Elstak
    Airbus Defence and Space NetherlandsThe Netherlands

    Rapporteur

    Jian Guo
    Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)The Netherlands

    Thomas Terzibaschian
    DLR, German Aerospace CenterGermany

    B4.6B. Generic Technologies for Nano/Pico Platforms

    This session covers emerging and promising generic technologies for nano and pico platforms. Real-life examples are particularly encouraged, both recently launched and shortly to be launched (next 3 years).

    Chairman

    Andy Vick
    RAL SpaceUnited Kingdom

    Co-Chair

    Zeger de Groot
    Innovative Solutions in Space BVThe Netherlands

    Rapporteur

    Martin Buscher
    Technische Universität BerlinGermany

    Eugene D Kim
    Satrec InitiativeKorea, Republic of

    B4.7. Constellations and Distributed Systems

    Small satellites offer important advantages in creating new opportunities for implementing spatially-distributed space-based systems (e.g. Constellations). In this session we focus on new, emerging, or enabling technologies that can be used or are being used to create networked data collection systems via small satellites. Specifically, Session B4.7 focuses on Constellations (e.g. Constellation missions for Earth Observation, IoT/M2M and LEO Communications), distributed architectures (e.g. Distributed SAR systems) and sensor systems and how these low-cost and rapidly delivered technologies offers the potential to fulfil complex user needs, working in coordination with other small or large space infrastructures (e.g. mega-constellations), as well as with airborne or terrestrial assets. Papers should show how cross-platform compatibility (both hardware and software aspects) can be used to enable these systems, any standards that are proposed or adopted, design techniques that enable this cross-platform compatibility, etc. We are particularly interested in technologies that enable small spacecraft to play an important role in upcoming applications, such as (but not limited to) civil security, telecommunications in remote areas, navigation support (e.g., along the new foreseen routes in the Arctic), natural disaster management (e.g., damage assessment and first responders support), and planetary exploration. In this regard, the development and usage of Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies are also of specific interest to the session. Distributed systems and their impact in terms of new opportunities for the emerging Commercial Space Industry and new commercial space missions with small platforms is also of specific interest to the session. The integrated applications of these sensor systems are covered in Symposium Session B5.2, and the broader view of tools and technologies to enable integrated applications are covered in B5.1. In B4.7 authors are also invited to analyze technological enhancements and new developments needed to guarantee small satellite integration with existing and scheduled assets from both the bus and payload perspectives. Also analysis of inter-operability within integrated systems can be addressed, like payload data management, spacecraft operation, and formation flying.

    Co-Chair

    Rainer Sandau
    International Academy of Astronautics (IAA)Germany

    Michele Grassi
    University of Naples "Federico II"Italy

    Rapporteur

    Jaime Esper
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)United States

    Aaron Rogers
    The John Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryUnited States

    B4.8. Small Spacecraft for Deep-Space Exploration

    This session focuses on innovative small spacecraft designs, systems, missions and technologies for the exploration and commercialization of space beyond Earth orbit. Target destinations for these miniaturized space probes include the Earth's Moon, Mars, comets and asteroids, as well as other destinations that are targets for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). Small exploration probes covered by this session may come in many different forms including special-purpose miniature spacecraft, standard format small platforms such as Cubesats or other microsats, nanosats, picosats, etc. Topics include new and emerging technologies including the use of commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies, miniaturized subsystems including propulsion, avionics, guidance navigation & control, power supply, communication, thermal management, and sensors and instruments. The main focus of this session is on new and emerging systems, missions, driving technologies and applications that are both government-funded as well as driven by commercial ventures.

    Co-Chair

    Leon Alkalai
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion LaboratoryUnited States

    Rene Laufer
    Baylor University / University of Cape TownUnited States

    Rapporteur

    Amanda Stiles
    Rocket LabUnited States

    B4.9-GTS.5. Small Satellite Missions Global Technical Session

    The Small Satellite Missions Global Technical Session (GTS) is collaboration between the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Small Satellite Missions Symposium and the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) Workforce Development/Young Professionals Programme Committee. This session is unique in that it allows for sharing of information on a global scale with presenters and audience both at the IAC venue and online at their home/work/university locations. Abstracts are solicited regarding operational missions or mature proposals for small satellite systems and related topics. These must have clear relevance on an international scale or at a business level, and must also provide young professionals a taste of what the space sector has to offer. Where possible, abstracts should have a wide interest in the community and should include transferable knowledge or lessons learned. Abstracts highlighting ingenuity or innovation are preferred. Examples include space missions utilizing small satellites that address specific new societal, scientific or commercial challenges, or novel technologies that have the potential to revolutionize space missions and/or enable their access to space. Papers are to describe the specific need, the small satellite approach that addresses this need, the benefits of this approach and the use of space technology, and demonstrate that other non-space approaches provide inferior solutions. Papers from, or directed at the young professional community are preferred. This session will be accepting submissions for oral presentations only.

    Co-Chair

    Matthias Hetscher
    DLR (German Aerospace Center)Germany

    Norbert Lemke
    OHB System AGGermany

    Rapporteur

    Alex da Silva Curiel
    Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL)United Kingdom

    B4.10-A6.10. Joint Small Satellite/Space Debris Session to promote the long-term sustainability of space

    This session facilitates bilateral discussions between Small Satellite and Space Debris communities for shared understanding of the challenges/issues and to promote practical small satellite solutions for the long-term sustainability of space. It will include topics such as: - Orbital debris mitigation solutions for small satellites and mega constellations - Small satellite orbital debris mitigation lessons learned, best practices and expected norms of behavior (including minimization of post-mission orbit lifetime, trackability) - Orbital debris mitigation compliance statistics and monitoring methods (for both small and large satellites) - Stakeholder education (bilateral) - Collision and warning risk assessment techniques and resulting estimates - Mitigation of risks to other operational spacecraft (ISS, etc.) - Small satellite propulsive requirements, methods and technology - Small satellite orbit regulation concepts - Small satellite deorbit technologies and lessons learned - Small satellite mission assurance, reliability and lessons learned - Small satellite deployment best practices and lessons learned - Tracking organization and small satellite operator interplay - Orbit, maneuver, and scenario data exchange.

    Co-Chair

    Darren McKnight
    Integrity Applications Incorporated (IAI)United States

    Igor Usovik
    Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TSNIIMASH)Russian Federation

    Rapporteur

    Upasana Dasgupta
    Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill UniversityCanada

    B4.IP. Interactive Presentations:26th IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SMALL SATELLITE MISSIONS

    This session offers a unique opportunity to deliver your key messages in an interactive presentation on any of the subjects on small satellite missions addressed in the classic Sessions. The presentation will be displayed on a digital screen in a dedicated location and available for view by all Congress attendees for the entire Congress week. In addition, one afternoon is dedicated exclusively for the attendees to view the Interactive Presentations, and the author will be assigned a specific ten minute slot to personally present the topic and interact with the attendees present. The Interactive Presentation may take advantage of all electronic display capabilities, such as: PowerPoint charts, embedded hot links, pictures, audio and video clips etc. An award will also be presented to the author of the best Interactive Presentation in the B Category at a special ceremony. An Abstract that follows the standard format must be submitted by the deadline for standard IAC abstracts.

    Co-Chair

    Alex da Silva Curiel
    Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL)United Kingdom

    Jian Guo
    Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)The Netherlands

    Support

    Rhoda Shaller Hornstein
    United States