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    IAC-19 — 70th International Astronautical Congress

    D5. 52nd IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SAFETY, QUALITY AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN SPACE ACTIVITIES

    Quality, safety, security… These domains reflect a same concern: how a complex space system can be developed and be operated in order to give its best with the proper robustness. In that environment, where radiations are not the least stress and possible ill-intentioned actions may occur, decreasing the level of failures in space activities is a must. Knowledge management, meaning proper capturing, capitalising, protecting and sharing the knowledge, and application of lessons learned and experience, are key factors. This Symposium organized by the International Academy of Astronautics aims at arousing the discussion between professionals and raising the awareness of the new generations on the various approaches to obtain and run reliable, resilient and safe space systems: to be addressed are design solutions, validation and tests, software development, and security, methods, management approaches, regulations to improve the quality, efficiency, and collaborative ability of space programs and space operations. All approaches are to be considered: risk management, complexity of systems and operations, knowledge and information management, human factors, economical constraints, international cooperation, norms, and standards.

    Coordinator

    Jeanne Holm
    United States

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom

    D5.1. Quality and safety, a challenge for traditional and new space

    Great or small, ambitious or recurrent, every space program is undertaken with great hopes ! But we are far from 100 % success even if ”Faster, better, cheaper” is 20 years old. Now that the span of the actors of space has enlarged, including lots of newcomers, what are the practices to cope with the risks of failure and the results achieved? This session deals with the methods, tests, lessons learned, standards for analysis and mitigation of such risks to maintain the desired quality. It provides an opportunity for exchanges on all aspects of the life cycle (including design, development and production philosophy, operations) and associated risk management approach. It addresses every kind of space missions: transportation systems, orbital systems, exploration vehicles.

    Co-Chair

    Manola Romero
    3AFFrance

    Alexander S. Filatyev
    Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI)Russian Federation

    D5.2. Knowledge management for space activities in the digital era

    The digital era is in full force in the aerospace industry. Knowledge Management plays a major role in this context to generate a community of shared and useful information. More advanced technologies give digital workers the opportunity to communicate and collaborate on a regular basis, in addition the proliferation of mobile devices and social media allows content to be more rapidly shared. This environment pushes towards understanding what critical knowledge is, how it can help drive down costs and seeing solutions. Key themes addressed during the session are: managing the sharing of the knowledge to develop new projects, what solutions are in place to work securely across corporate and international boundaries, how is knowledge captured, shared, and used to drive innovation and create value to the organization, collaboration and culture, the financial value of KM to the business, processes and technologies that organisations are using to sustain, energise and invigorate their ability to learn, innovate, and share knowledge. Examples of case studies of particular interest include successful projects and innovations in the application of knowledge management, grounded research in knowledge and risk management, methods that allow data, information or knowledge exchange within or amongst organisations in support of actual programmes, and capturing engineering knowledge and information in computer models.

    Co-Chair

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom

    Patrick Hambloch
    University of Alabama in HuntsvilleUnited States

    Rapporteur

    Daniel Galarreta
    Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)France

    Stefano Ferretti
    European Space Agency (ESA)Italy

    Jeanne Holm
    United States

    D5.3. Space Environment and effects on space missions

    The space environment can strongly impact the performance of spacecraft systems and science instruments, the reliability of space missions, and ultimately mission success. The space environment has several components, including high-energy radiations, plasma, atomic oxygen, planetary dust, extreme temperature, vacuum, micro-gravity, micrometeoroid and debris, etc. Environmental conditions yield constraints at the design phases, and risk mitigation in the course of the mission. The evaluation of the nominal and worst-case conditions to be met, and of their impact on mission science objectives, instruments and spacecraft systems/sub-systems are thus of prime importance. This session will encompass the following topics: Space Weather, Plasma, Spacecraft Charging, Radiation, Atomic Oxygen, Planetary Dust, Interactions with Planetary Exospheres and Plumes, Combined Environments, Physical Processes, Modelling and Prediction, Risk Mitigation, Ground Testing, Flight Measurements, Flight Experiments, In-Flight Anomaly Resolution and Lessons Learned.

    Co-Chair

    Jean-Francois Roussel
    Office National d’Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA)France

    MENGU CHO
    Kyushu Institute of TechnologyJapan

    Rapporteur

    Carlos Soares
    NASA Jet Propulsion LaboratoryUnited States

    D5.4. Cyber-security threats to space missions and countermeasures to address them

    The global network connectivity offered by the Internet introduces whole new families of cyber-security threats that can target space missions. To send commands to a spacecraft nowadays one would not need to build a ground station, but just penetrate from home or office the existing ground infrastructures, challenging and bypassing their protection measures. A whole new generation of countermeasures needs thus to be designed and enacted. These questions will be addressed in the session: - What are cyber-crime/cyber-activism interests wrt space activities? - How are aerospace organisations managing to introduce the right level of security measures to protect their development of new missions? - How is knowledge about security threats captured, shared among the constituency, and used to cope with the evolution of cyber threats? - Which ones of the new specific threats are to be expected to target space missions, from the ground and up into space? – How is the complex supply chain spanning international boundaries and continents going to affect the security of the platforms? - How can the new attractive technologies like blockchain, quantum-key distribution, quantum computing, Internet of Things (IoT), big data, social media, or cloud applications, be exploited without introducing new risks? Case studies are solicited to focus on cryptography, processes, operational security, supply chain, and other aspects of space missions that are all constituting the technical and organizational measures necessary to make a mission “cyber secure”.

    Co-Chair

    Stefano Zatti
    ESAItaly

    Julien Airaud
    Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)France

    D5.IP. Interactive Presentations - 52nd IAA SYMPOSIUM ON SAFETY, QUALITY AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN SPACE ACTIVITIES

    This session offers a unique opportunity to deliver your key messages in an interactive presentation on any of the subjects of Safety, Quality and Knowledge Management in Space Activities addressed in the classic Sessions. The presentation will be displayed on a digital screen in a dedicated location and available for view by all Congress attendees for the entire Congress week. In addition, one afternoon is dedicated exclusively for the attendees to view the Interactive Presentations, and the author will be assigned a specific ten minute slot to personally present the topic and interact with the attendees present. The Interactive Presentation may take advantage of all electronic display capabilities, such as: PowerPoint charts, embedded hot links, pictures, audio and video clips etc. An award will also be presented to the author of the best Interactive Presentation in the D Category at a special ceremony. An Abstract that follows the standard format must be submitted by the deadline for standard IAC abstracts.

    Co-Chair

    Jeanne Holm
    United States

    Roberta Mugellesi-Dow
    European Space Agency (ESA)United Kingdom